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Johnson Space Center Manual Example 2

Johnson Space Center Handbook Chapter

Before

** 207.1 Introduction

For JSC emergencies, call x33333. For Ellington Field emergencies, call x47231. For White Sands Test Facility emergencies, call x5911. Off site, call 911. The first priority of a person on site who observes an outbreak of fire or other situation that constitutes an emergency is to immediately contact the emergency phone numbers for assistance. In many cases, immediate evacuation of a facility or area may be necessary. Notification and evacuation are to have priority over attempts by untrained personnel to combat the emergency. It is JSC policy that employees not “fight” fires that cannot be safely extinguished with a hand held fire extinguisher unless such employees are certified members of a fire brigade or any formally organized fire department. Employees should not try to fight a fire unless they first notify the fire department, are trained in fire extinguisher use, and can safely extinguish the fire.

207.2 Purpose

The purpose of this chapter is to provide guidelines for reporting an emergency and details what shall be contained in emergency action plans that give information and guidance to building personnel after an incident has been discovered.

207.3 Scope

This chapter applies to the reporting of medical and fire emergencies and emergencies involving a hazardous substance anywhere on JSC property, including Ellington Field and the Sonny Carter Training Facility. Also included are guidelines for general emergency action plans in each of the JSC and Ellington Field buildings.

207.4 Responsibility

207.4.1 Directors

Directors of organizations are responsible for the following actions:

a. Ensuring that emergency action plans are developed for their assigned facilities.

b. Appointing and providing for the training of facility managers for the building and/or facility.

c. Ensuring that hazards in or near the workplace are identified and properly mitigated.

d. Ensuring that the employees in the facility are aware of hazards of the workplace and are properly trained in the appropriate actions to take in emergency situations.

207.4.2 Supervisors

Supervisors are responsible for the following actions:

a. Encouraging employee participation in developing and writing emergency action plans.

b. Instructing their employees in the procedures contained in the emergency action plan.

c. Ensuring their employees are trained in how to recognize and protect themselves from hazards in the workplace.

d. Procedures to account for employees after evacuation.

e.. Ensuring their employees abide by the requirements of their emergency action plan and follow the instructions of fire wardens and emergency response personnel during an emergency.

207.4.3 Facility Managers

Facility managers are responsible for the following actions:

a. Appointment of assistant fire wardens as required

b. Development of building emergency evacuation plans

c. Inspection of facilities for hazards and ensuring corrective action is taken to mitigate the hazards

d. Ensuring the proper training of occupants in building emergency action plans

e. Familiarity with evacuation routes within the facility and ensuring physically impaired occupants are assisted during emergencies

207.4.4 Employees

Each employee is responsible for knowing the following:

a. How to recognize and protect themselves from hazards in their workplace

b. How to accurately report an emergency (dial the proper emergency number from a safe location) and notify other facility occupants according to the emergency action plan

c. What action should be taken after the report has been made

d. What is contained in the emergency action plan for his/her area or facility

e. What actions he/she is to take when an emergency situation is discovered

f. Where the facility designated safe area is so they can be accounted for after an evacuation

207.4.5 Physically Impaired Persons

See Employee Requiring Evacuation Assistance (EREA) policy from ESC. The JSC Personnel Office and the building fire warden are responsible for the training of physically impaired persons and those assigned to assist them for emergency evacuation from JSC buildings.

207.5 Emergency Reporting

207.5.1 Reporting a Fire or Other Emergency

All fires or other emergencies must be reported immediately by telephone. The person reporting the emergency by telephone or manual building fire alarm station should, if possible, meet the facility manager or responding emergency personnel as they enter the building. Any fire, even a small one or one that has already been extinguished, must be reported. When reporting an emergency to the JSC Security dispatcher on x33333 (at Ellington Field, x4723l; at WSTF, x5911), it is essential that as much information as possible be given the dispatcher so that the appropriate emergency personnel can be directed to the scene.

For example, if an actual fire is observed, perform these actions in the following order:

1. Evacuate personnel from the building by activating a manual pull station. This will ring the building fire alarm bells and send a signal to the fire station security/dispatcher.

2. Confirm the alarm by telephoning the appropriate emergency phone number from a safe location

(a) State “ I am calling to report a fire…”

(b) Give details as to the exact location (bldg and room #), size of the fire, and type of fire (chemical, electrical, paper, etc.)

(c) Stay on the line until directed by the dispatcher

3. Only attempt to extinguish the fire if

(a) The fire is small

(b) You have been trained in the use of portable fire extinguishers

(c) There is no risk to your safety

(d) You are confident of your ability to extinguish the fire

If an odor of smoke is detected, it should be reported as a smoke odor, along with the vicinity where the odor was first detected and the reporter’s name and extension.

If an explosion, escaping gas, or chemical or flammable liquid spill has taken place; the materials involved, if known; and an indication of the extent of the emergency should be reported. Give the dispatcher the reporter’s name and telephone extension.

207.5.2 Reporting a Medical Emergency

When reporting an accident or medical emergency to the JSC Security dispatcher on x33333 (at Ellington Field, x4723l; at WSTF, x5111), it is essential that as much information as possible be given to the dispatcher so that the appropriate emergency personnel can be directed to the scene. State “I am calling to report an accident/medical emergency. Please send an ambulance to…” If possible, have someone meet the responding emergency personnel at a predetermined entrance of the building to provide exact

directions.

207.5.2.1 Life-Threatening Injury or Illness

In the case of a life-threatening injury or illness, perform these functions in the following order:

1. Notify the appropriate emergency phone number dispatcher of the exact location of the incident including building and room number, if applicable.

2. Report the type and severity of the injury or illness and the name of the patient if known.

3. Give reporter’s name and telephone extension.

4. Do not move the injured person without directions from professional medical personnel or unless it is clearly a life-threatening situation or location.

5. Provide first aid assistance to the injured person until emergency personnel arrive.

207.5.2.2 Non-Life-Threatening Injury or Illness

In the case of a non-life-threatening injury or illness, perform these functions in the following order:

1. Notify the appropriate emergency phone number dispatcher of the exact location of the incident including building and room number.

2. Report the type and severity of the injury and that it does not appear to be life-threatening.

3. Give the dispatcher the reporter’s name and telephone extension.

207.6 Emergency Action Plan

207.6.1 Facilities

Each facility or building at JSC is required to have an emergency action plan designed to protect employees and property in the event of an emergency. JSC 05900, “JSC Emergency Preparedness Plan,” describes the Center’s overall planned response to emergencies.

However, there are critical areas within JSC facilities where the occurrence of an emergency such as a fire or other related mishap (flammable liquid spill, etc.) would demand a unique response from workers in the area, the safety organization, the security force, and responding firefighters or emergency medical service personnel. Consequently, comprehensive planning should be undertaken after a thorough analysis of the potential hazard has been completed. While even office-type facilities require a basic emergency action plan, the following target areas may require more extensive preplanning consideration:

a. Essential electronic equipment areas.

b. Aircraft hangars.

c. Chemical laboratories or any area containing hazardous chemicals.

d. Transformers.

e. Road routes for the transportation of hazardous materials.

f. Vital record storage areas.

g. Any area using/storing hazardous materials.

h. Test areas involving human subjects.

207.6.2 Assistance in Preplanning

The JSC or WSTF Emergency Planning Office (EPO) can provide assistance and advice to responsible organizations in the preparation of emergency action plans and in coordination of requirements and procedures.

207.6.3 Emergency Action Plan Requirements

An emergency action plan should cover the designated actions that must be taken to ensure employee safety from emergencies. The JSC EPO has prepared a document titled “Tips for Writing an Emergency Action Plan” that contains detailed guidelines and a sample plan outline that may be useful in developing these plans. As a minimum, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires that the following elements be included in emergency action plans:

a. Emergency escape route assignments and procedures.

b. Procedures for employees who must remain to operate critical operations before they evacuate.

c. Procedures to account for employees after evacuation.

d. Rescue and medical duties.

e. Means for reporting emergencies.

f. Persons or departments to contact for further information.

In addition to the above, all JSC emergency action plans must also incorporate the elements of a fire prevention plan. These elements are as follows:

a. A list of the major workplace fire hazards and their proper handling and storage procedures.

b. Potential ignition sources (such as welding, smoking, and others) and their control procedures.

c. The type of fire protection equipment or systems available in the building.

To obtain a copy of “Tips for Writing an Emergency Action Plan,” contact either the JSC EPO, the JSC Health, Safety, and Environmental Compliance Office, or your building’s facility manager.

207.7 References

29 CFR 1910.38, “Employee Emergency Plans and Fire Protection Plans”

NHB 1700.1(V1-B), “NASA Safety Policy and Requirements Document,” Chapter 9

JSC 05900, “JSC Emergency Preparedness Plan


After

This could be you . . .

Several people could have been exposed to a toxic gas because they left their buildings after the gas release. They didn’t know what to do.

A fire in an area with hazardous materials burned longer than it should have while firefighters tried to find out if they could use water on the fire. Little planning had been done for this emergency.

A computer area was flooded when a water line broke. The emergency plan didn’t cover water leaks.

1. Who must follow this chapter?

You must follow this chapter if you work at JSC or a JSC field site. If you are a supervisor, facility manager, or director, Paragraph 16 of this chapter lists your responsibilities.

2. What does this chapter cover?

This chapter tells you what to do in an emergency of any kind and what emergency planning JSC must do.

Emergency action

3. What emergencies must I report?

You must report any emergency that you see. This includes any fire, no matter how small. Report fires that have been extinguished. They may still be smoldering and could reignite.

Remember, your emergency numbers are: x33333 at JSC, x44444 at Ellington Field, 911 at any off-site location, and x5911 at White Sands Test Facility.

You must call your emergency number if you see an emergency.

You must keep the emergency scene as undisturbed as possible. If you don’t, valuable evidence for the investigators could be destroyed.

4. How will I be told that there is an emergency?

You could be told of an emergency in two ways:

a. A building fire alarm.

b. The JSC employee alarm system. See the diagram at the end of Paragraph 5 below.

5. What must I do in an emergency?

If you are involved in an emergency, you must take the actions in this table for the kind of emergency it is.

If you . . . Then . . .
Hear a building fire alarm Leave the building immediately using the exit routes shown on the evacuation diagram on your floor.

Don’t use the elevators.

Use an alternate route if you can’t use the primary exit route.

Shut down hazardous operations and secure classified material if you have time.

Go to a “safe area” designated by your supervisor so he or she can account for you.

Move your group to another area if the “safe area,” isn’t safe.

Remain at least 75 feet from the building until you get further instructions.

NEVER re-enter an evacuated area until declared safe by Safety personnel on the scene or the ALL CLEAR siren is sounded. See a fire Evacuate people from the building by pulling the lever on a fire alarm pull box. This will ring the building fire alarm bells and signal the dispatcher.

Call your emergency phone number from a safe location to make sure the dispatcher got the alarm signal.

Say, “I am calling to report a fire…”

Tell the dispatcher where the fire is (building and room number), how big the fire is, and what type of fire it is (such as chemical, electrical, or paper).

Stay on the line until the dispatcher says you may hang up. The dispatcher may put your call on hold briefly while emergency units are dispatched.

Give the dispatcher any information you think would help the emergency personnel find the fire.

Tell the dispatcher your name and the extension you are calling from.

Meet the facility manager or emergency personnel near the building entrance if possible to relay vital information.

Go to a safe area designated by your supervisor so he or she can account for you.

NEVER re-enter an evacuated area until declared safe by Safety personnel on the scene or the ALL CLEAR siren is sounded. If you . . . Then . . . Smell smoke

Smoke may come from many sources such as:

Fluorescent light ballast

Appliances such as coffee makers and stoves

Jammed paper in a copy machine

Electronics

Welding or cutting Try to find the source of the smoke as soon as possible if it is only a faint odor.

If you can’t find the smoke, the smell gets stronger, you see flames, or see large amounts of smoke evacuate people from the building by pulling the lever on a fire alarm pull box.

Call your emergency phone number from a safe location to make sure the dispatcher got the alarm signal.

Say, “I am calling to report that I smell smoke…”

Tell the dispatcher where you smelled the smoke (building and room number).

Meet the facility manager or emergency personnel near the building entrance if possible to relay vital information.

Go to a safe area designated by your supervisor so he or she can account for you.

NEVER re-enter an evacuated area until declared safe by Safety personnel on the scene or the ALL CLEAR siren is sounded. See or are involved in a medical emergency on your site - even if it isn’t work-related Call your emergency phone number from a safe location.

Say “I am calling to report a medical emergency. Please send an ambulance to…”

Tell the dispatcher where the emergency is (building and room number) and who the injured person is, if you know.

Stay on the line until the dispatcher says you may hang up. The dispatcher may put your call on hold briefly while emergency units are dispatched.

Tell the dispatcher what and how bad the injury is, whether it seems life-threatening, and whether the person is conscious or breathing.

Give the dispatcher any information you think would help the emergency personnel find the injured person.

Tell the dispatcher your name and the extension you are calling from.

Have someone meet the emergency personnel near the building entrance if possible.

Don’t move the injured person unless he or she is clearly in a life-threatening situation.

Stay with the injured person until medical help arrives.

Make sure blood is cleaned up by trained personnel. If you . . . Then . . . See an explosion, leaking gas, or a chemical spill Call your emergency phone number from a safe location.

Don’t activate any fire alarms or evacuate any buildings.

Tell the dispatcher what you saw.

Tell the dispatcher what materials are involved, if you know.

Tell the dispatcher where the emergency is and how big the spill, leak, or explosion is.

Stay on the line until the dispatcher says you may hang up. The dispatcher may put your call on hold briefly while emergency units are dispatched.

Give the dispatcher any information you think would help the emergency personnel find the emergency.

Tell the dispatcher your name and extension you are calling from.

Stay on the line until the dispatcher says you may hang up.

Stay in your safe location until you get further instructions. If you hear the employee alarm system: Get inside a building as soon possible and warn others to stay inside

Close all doors and windows

Tell your facility manager, supervisor, or Safety Officer

Turn off the air handlers (call x33061 for help at JSC)

Call your emergency number if you have important information about the emergency

Move cross-wind to any chemical clouds

Stay inside until you get further instructions over the employee alarm system

6. May I put out a fire with a fire extinguisher?

Don’t try to fight fire that you can’t safely put out with a hand held fire extinguisher unless you are a member of a trained fire brigade or fire department. You may try to put out a fire if:

a. You or someone else has called the emergency number.

b. The fire is small.

c. You are trained to use a portable fire extinguisher. Otherwise, you could put yourself in danger by using the wrong extinguisher or using it improperly.

d. There is no risk to your safety and the fire isn’t between you and an exit.

e. You know you can safely put out the fire.

7. What if I need help to exit a building?

If you can’t use the stairs, hear a fire alarm, or see well enough to exit the building because of some physical problem you must follow the procedures in Chapter 201, “Fire safety and housekeeping practices,” of this handbook.

8. Who responds to JSC emergencies?

JSC and JSC field sites must provide adequate emergency response personnel and equipment to deal with all potential emergencies. These personnel and equipment may be provided by civil servants, a contractor, or local fire departments through mutual aid agreements. All emergency response personnel must be trained to do their jobs safely and effectively. At JSC, the following organizations or individuals are available to respond to emergencies:

a. Houston Fire Department and mutual aid agreements with other surrounding communities on-site at JSC

b. Ellington Fire Department at Ellington Field

c. Fire protection specialists to be liaisons with local fire departments from the Occupational Safety and Quality Assurance Branch

d. Emergency medical technicians from the JSC Clinic who back up the Houston Fire Department

e. Spill response teams from the Environmental Services Office

If you work at a JSC field site, see your site emergency planning personnel for information on emergency response.

Emergency planning

9. What must I know about emergency planning as a JSC employee?

As a JSC employee, you must:

a. Know the exit routes you must take to evacuate your floor.

b. Know what emergencies could occur in your work area, how to recognize them, and how to protect yourself if you are in danger.

c. Know any special emergency procedures for your work area.

d. Know where you can find the emergency action plan for your work area.

e. Follow those procedures if an emergency happens.

10. What emergency planning must JSC do?

JSC and JSC field sites must:

a. Identify all emergencies that could happen at that site and how to respond to them.

b. Have a site-wide emergency plan. JSC 05900, “JSC Emergency Preparedness Plan,” describes JSC’s overall emergency response plans.

c. Have the Houston Fire Department or local fire department review the emergency plan.

d. Review the emergency plan yearly or after each major emergency.

e. Have a site-wide emergency drill yearly.

f. Evaluate the site emergency plan after each yearly drill or after each major emergency. Update the plan if necessary.

g. Have a fire drill for each building yearly.

11. What buildings or work areas must have emergency action plans?

Each building at JSC must have an emergency action plan to protect employees and property if an emergency happens.

12. What must a building emergency action plan cover?

An emergency action plan must tell you what to do in an emergency. An emergency action plan must:

a. Cover the following:

Emergency escape procedures and routes

Procedures for employees who stay behind to do critical tasks before they evacuate

Procedures to account for employees after evacuation

Rescue and medical duties for those who perform them

How to report emergencies

Who to contact for more information

b. Establish the following:

The employee alarm (warning) system

The type of evacuation to be used in emergency circumstances

Training of a sufficient number of persons

To get a copy of “Tips for Writing an Emergency Action Plan,” contact either the Emergency Operations Center Office, the Occupational Safety and Quality Assurance Branch, or your building’s facility manager. This document gives you guidelines for writing an emergency action plan and an outline of an emergency action plan.

13. What about critical or hazardous areas inside or around JSC facilities?

Critical or hazardous areas within or around JSC facilities must have a more detailed emergency action plan. Critical areas are locations where an emergency could require a unique response from workers in the area, safety, security, firefighters, or emergency medical personnel.

These critical or hazardous areas include:

a. Areas with essential electronic equipment

b. Aircraft hangars

c. Areas with transformers

d. Routes used to transport hazardous materials

e. Any area that stores vital records

f. Any area that uses or stores hazardous materials

g. Test areas that involve human subjects

Emergency action plans must be written separately for these unique areas and contain essentially the same information as building emergency action plans described above.

Read the individual chapters that apply to your work area for more details on emergency actions you must take in your work area.

14. How do I get help with my emergency action plan?

Contact the Emergency Operations Center Office at JSC or your site’s emergency planners. They will give you advice and review your emergency action plan.

15. Where can I get more information on emergency planning?

You can find more information on emergency planning in these documents:

a. 29 CFR 1910.38, “Employee Emergency Plans and Fire Protection Plans”

b. NHB 1700.1 (V1-B), “NASA Safety Policy and Requirements Document,” Chapter 9

c. JSC 05900, including all annexes

d. National Fire Protection Association Standard 101, “Life Safety Code”

Check with your community city hall for information in developing a personal emergency action plan to protect your family and loved ones.

Responsibilities

16. Who else has responsibilities for emergency action and planning?

a. If you are a supervisor, you must:

Encourage your employee to participate in emergency planning.

Train your employees in your emergency action plan.

Designate a specific area around the facility for your employees to gather.

Account for your employees after an evacuation.

Make sure your employees follow the emergency action plan.

Make sure your employees follow instructions from fire wardens and emergency response personnel during an emergency.

Make arrangements for any of your employees who will need help exiting your building because of physical problems. Contact the Human Resources Office for more details.

Hold a briefing with employees after each drill or emergency to verify whether the emergency action plan worked well. Solicit employee recommendations to improve the emergency action plan and update it accordingly. Retrain all employees in the revised procedures to make sure they understand.

Review your emergency action plan yearly and forward a copy to the Emergency Operations Center Office for review.

b. If you are a facility manager, you must:

Make sure each of your buildings has an emergency action plan.

Be aware of any special hazards in your building.

Make sure your building occupants are trained on your emergency action plan.

Know the evacuation routes in your facility and make sure they are kept clear.

Be aware of employees in your facility who will need help exiting the building because of physical problems. Make sure they have made arrangements with their supervisors.

Work with your building Fire Wardens and supervisors to develop an employee protection team for rapid, safe evacuations, and quick employee accountability.

Report to responding emergency personnel to brief them on the situation at your facility and tell them if anyone needs to be rescued. Stay at the emergency command post to help emergency responders and act as liaison between the emergency personnel and facility employees who may need more information.

Have a sign in and sign out sheet for maintenance personnel working in locked areas. Pick up the sheet when exiting during an emergency and carry it with you outside so you will know who is behind locked areas. Report that information to the Fire Protection Specialist or security officer.

Report any missing employees who may be in danger in the evacuated facility to arriving emergency personnel, preferably to the Fire Protection Specialist or a security officer.

c. If you are a fire warden, you must:

Gather at elevators or other specified areas to determine who is present on each floor.

Canvas your assigned areas and other areas if another Fire Warden is known to be absent. Knock on the mechanical room and restroom doors and remind anyone inside to evacuate the building.

Indicate to other floor Fire Wardens that their area(s) have been cleared and you all can leave the floor (using voice or hand signals).

Report to the Chief Fire Warden or Facility Manager when exiting the building at the designated area. Give them an “all clear” or tell them of any problems encountered such as people waiting in Area of Rescue Assistance or people not evacuating.

d. If you are an organizational director at JSC, you must:

Make sure that your facilities have emergency action plans.

Make sure your facility managers are trained in emergency action and planning.

Make sure your employees know about all possible emergencies and what to do for each possible emergency.