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Johnson Space Center Manual Example 1

Johnson Space Center Handbook Chapter

Before

These rewrites of a contractor manual greatly improve the relationship between the material and the reader.

** 101.1 Policy

It is the basic policy of JSC to take all practical steps to avoid loss of life, personnel injury or illness, property loss or damage, or environmental loss or damage.

101.2 Goals and Objectives

101.2.1 Goals

JSC’s goals are

a. To achieve a successful and unified occupational safety and health program while accomplishing JSC’s objective for excellence in human space flight.

b. Of equal importance, to become a nationally recognized center of excellence for occupational safety and health. This excellence will also be a prominent feature of JSC’s environmental protection and emergency preparedness program.

101.2.2 Objectives

JSC shall comply with applicable regulations and standards, including those of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

By exercising flexibility and creativity in striving for excellence, JSC will go beyond the minimum requirements of the regulations and standards to provide the best feasible protection for workers at JSC and the environment within the constraints of available resources.

101.3 Purpose, Scope, and Applicability

This handbook is applicable to the White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) except as noted in individual chapters. If a chapter is noted to be nonapplicable to WSTF, WSTF should comply with the intent and develop equivalent WSTF requirements. The WSTF Quality Assurance, Reliability, and Safety Office will perform the same functions for WSTF as the JSC Health, Safety, and Environmental Compliance Office does for JSC. WSTF may use equivalent forms in lieu of JSC forms.

101.3.1 Purpose

JSC recognizes that to become a center of excellence for occupational safety and health, there must be more than just compliance with regulations and standards. The goal can only be accomplished through development and implementation of a comprehensive program stressing improvement and excellence. JSC and contractor employees at all levels must be active participants.

JSC further recognizes that environmental protection and emergency preparedness are natural adjuncts to its occupational safety and health programs. This handbook documents these programs as well.

JSC also recognizes that a successful program requires a vision and commitment to improvement and excellence that extends beyond the boundaries of JSC-administered programs, facilities, and worksites. This dedication to excellence will manifest itself in exemplary safety and health programs and also in associated environmental protection and emergency preparedness programs necessary to support appropriate forums identified in this handbook.

101.3.2 Scope and Applicability

This handbook shall have precedence over all other JSC documentation in safety, health, environmental protection, and emergency preparedness. Conflicts in the requirements of this handbook and other JSC documents shall be brought to the immediate attention of the Director of JSC’s Safety, Reliability, and Quality Assurance (SR&QA) Office.

The scope of this handbook extends to all locations over which JSC has jurisdiction, unless specifically exempted. Executive Order (E.O.) 12196, “Occupational Safety and Health Programs for Federal Employees,” 29 CFR 1960, “Basic Program Elements for Federal Employee Occupational Safety and Health Programs,” and this document apply to all federal employees at JSC and their worksites, except the employees and worksites that involve unique military equipment, systems, and operations. Requirements and standards contained herein are binding on JSC contractors as incorporated by contract statement of work. Non-NASA, non-contractor personnel will follow the provisions of this document when on JSC property.

JSC federal employees who work in establishments of private employers are covered by the JSC occupational safety and health programs as provided in this handbook. Although NASA may not have the authority to require abatement of hazardous conditions in a private sector workplace, NASA must ensure safe and healthful working conditions for its employees. This shall be accomplished by administrative controls, personal protective equipment, or withdrawal of the JSC federal employees from the private sector facility to the extent necessary to assure that the federal employees are protected.

101.4 Ruling Authorities

The Occupational Safety and Health Act (the Act) Public Law 91-596, 84 Statute 1590, became effective April 28, 1971. The Act authorizes the development and enforcement of standards to ensure safe and healthful working conditions for employees in the private sector and also contains provisions applying to federal agencies and their employees. Section 19 of the Act requires federal agencies to have comprehensive occupational safety and health programs consistent with the standards authorized by Section 6 of the Act. The head of each agency is required to take other specific actions after consulting with representatives of employees (labor organizations, where applicable).

E.O. 12196 was issued on February 26, 1980. It directs federal agencies to implement effective occupational safety and health programs, provides for the evaluation of federal agency programs by the Department of Labor (DOL), and provides for the transmittal of these evaluations to the President.

E.O. 12196 also authorizes the DOL to issue program elements to assist federal agencies in establishing and operating their programs with sufficient flexibility consistent with their respective mission, size, and organization. Basic elements for federal employee occupational safety and health programs were published in the Federal Register on October 21, 1980 (29 CFR 1960), and amended by subsequent issuances in the Federal Register. Federal agencies are required to observe these program elements.

Overall policy and responsibility for safety and health within NASA are described in NMI 8710.2, “NASA Safety and Health Program.” This document also provides necessary guidance to implement the objectives of NMI 8710.2.

Basic policy and responsibilities for environmental protection within NASA are described in NHB 8800.11, “Implementing the Provisions of the National Environmental Policy Act”; NMI 8800.13, “Prevention, Abatement, and Control of Environmental Pollution”; and E.O. 12088, “Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards,” as amended. This document provides corresponding guidance for JSC programs.

101.5 Nonconformance Conditions

Four conditions may exist where JSC may not be in compliance with provisions of NHB 2710.1, “NASA Safety and Health Handbook,” Occupational Safety and Health Programs, or standards adopted therein. Those conditions and the actions necessary to sustain them are as follows:

a. Nonconformance with specific safety or occupational health policy which is developed solely by NASA may be approved on review by the Director, NASA Office of Safety and Mission Assurance or the Director, NASA Office of Life and Microgravity Sciences and Applications, respectively. This review process will facilitate JSC’s implementation of specific safety and health policies through different means that provide equal or greater protection for personnel.

b. Nonconformance with specific policy not within the discretion of NASA (for example, different program elements from those required by 29 CFR 1960, E.O. 12196, or a specific OSHA requirement) must be submitted by JSC to the appropriate Headquarters official (i.e., the Director, NASA Office of Safety and Mission Assurance or the Director, NASA Office of Life and Microgravity Sciences and Applications). Review of such request will ensue and, if concurred in, an alternate policy justification for the entire Agency will be transmitted to the Secretary of Labor or other approving authority.

c. Nonconformance with existing standards where the intention is to correct the condition or procedure requires an abatement plan, provided the situation requires more than 30 days to abate. See chapter 104 for requirements to develop abatement plans.

d. Nonconformance with existing standards where the intention is not to achieve compliance requires the development and approval of an alternate/supplementary standard or request for waiver. See chapter 103 for further details.

101.6 Private Employer and Federal Contractor Rights and Responsibilities

No provision of E.O. 12196 or this document shall be construed in any manner to relieve any private employer, including federal contractors or their employees, of any rights or responsibilities under the provisions of OSHA, including compliance activities conducted by the DOL or other appropriate activity.

Protection of employees of private contractors is covered by the provisions of OSHA. E.O. 12196 and 29 CFR 1960 do not apply to employees of private contractors or their working conditions when performing work under government contracts. This handbook is not a direct instruction to JSC contractors, but provides guidance to the responsible JSC contracting officer. For contractors, it is applicable (as appropriate) through contract clauses in conformance with the NASA Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement. As specified by contract, this handbook applies to all contractor personnel involved in JSC operations. Contractors will retain full responsibility for the safety and health of their employees regardless of whether their employees perform their duties in JSC-owned or leased facilities, with government equipment, or together with government personnel. JSC contracts (including any subsequent contractual direction) will not conflict with or otherwise abrogate this responsibility of contractors for their employees.


After

This could be you . . .

A hypergol technician didn’t follow requirements and caused a major fuel spill and was burned.

A person using a tool didn’t follow the requirement to have it tethered. The tool fell 16 stories to the floor. Fortunately no one was hurt.

Two employees spilled a caustic battery electrolyte on their hands. The batteries hadn’t been through qualification testing. There were no requirements to prevent the technicians from working with unqualified batteries.

1. Who must follow this handbook?

This handbook applies to anyone at JSC or JSC field sites, unless exempted in a specific chapter. For this handbook, “JSC” includes all JSC sites in the Houston, Texas, area such as Ellington Field and the Sonny Carter Training Facility. The handbook applies to operations involving JSC personnel or equipment at non-JSC locations, including foreign countries. See Chapter 113, Paragraph 5, for more information on following standards at non-JSC locations.

1. The following table tells you who must follow this handbook.
 
If you . . ._ _** ** Then you must follow . . .__ Are a federal employee This handbook unless you work at a site that involves unique military equipment and operations Are a JSC contractor This handbook as called out in your contract’s statement of work Work at a JSC remote site (such as White Sands Test Facility) as a civil service employee or contractor employee All chapters that don’t exempt you and local requirements that meet the intent of any chapter that exempts you Are a non NASA or non contract employee This handbook while on JSC property


1. If you are a federal employee working in a private employer’s facility, you are covered by the JSC safety and health program. Although NASA may not have the authority to correct hazardous conditions in a private sector workplace, NASA must make sure your working conditions are safe and healthful. NASA does this by administrative controls, personal protective equipment, or your withdrawal from the private employer’s facility.

2. If you are a private employer, neither Executive Order 12196, “Occupational Safety and Health Programs for Federal Employees,” nor this handbook relieves you or your employees of any rights or responsibilities under the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

2. What about field sites?

This handbook applies to you if you are at any JSC field site like White Sands Test Facility unless specific chapters exempt you.

1. If a chapter exempts you, you must develop your own requirements that meet the intent of that chapter.

2. The local Quality Assurance, Reliability, and Safety Office or equivalent will carry out the responsibilities of the Occupational Safety and Quality Assurance Branch at your site.

3. How should I use this handbook?

You don’t need to read this entire handbook. You need to know and follow only the safety and health requirements which apply to your job.

This handbook contains several features to help you find the requirements you need:

1. Table of contents and index

2. Subject index

3. Tables in the first chapter of each part that tell you which chapters apply to what jobs

4. Chapter titles

5. Chapter introductions that tell you who has to follow that chapter

6. online version at http:\www4.jsc.nasa.gov\safety\home\safeman.htm

4. What parts of this handbook must I follow?

You must follow any part of this handbook that applies to your job. The table below tells you which parts apply to what job. You will find a similar table in the first chapter of each part.

If your job or facility operations involve . . .** Then you must follow . . .**
Any work at JSC or JSC field sites Part 1, JSC’s safety and health program

Part 2, Safety and health practices for everyone Working with batteries

Working with lasers

Working in warehouses

Preparing or serving food

Working with cryogenic liquids or gases

Handling new or unique hardware

Working in chemical or research laboratories

Doing test operations

Entering confined spaces Part 3, Safety and health requirements for certain hazardous tests Working in noisy areas

Wearing a respirator

Working with ionizing or non-ionizing radiation

Coming in contact with biohazards, blood or body fluids Part 4, Health protection practices Working in machine shops

Working with electricity

Welding, cutting, or brazing

Lifting materials

Working with hand or power tools

Working on ladders, scaffolds, or elevated platforms Part 5, Safety and health practices for manufacturing, installation, repair, and maintenance Working with or transporting hazardous materials Part 6, Safety and health practices for hazardous materials Designing or constructing JSC facilities
Operating hazardous or complex facilities Part 7, Safety and health practices for JSC facilities and facility systems Overseeing JSC contracts or purchases Part 8, Safety and health in JSC

5. What chapters from Parts 1 and 2 must I follow?

Parts 1 and 2 apply to all JSC employees. This table tells you which chapters from Part 1 you must follow. Chapter 200 has a similar table.

If you are a . . .** Then you must . . .** From Chapter . . .**
JSC employee Know about employee involvement 101
Follow JSC’s basic safety and health policies 101  
Know your rights and responsibilities 102  
Know what to do in an emergency 103  
Know how to get medical help if you are injured on the job 104  
Know how to report and correct hazards 105  
Know how to report close calls and mishaps 106  
Know about safety and health inspections 107  
Know about safety and health training 108  
Know about workers compensation 110  
Know about safety and health standards 113  
Know how your organization will be evaluated on safety and health 116  
JSC employee who does hazardous tasks Follow the requirements for hazardous operations 109
JSC employee who does job safety or hazard analysis Follow the requirements for job safety and hazard analysis 111
Fire warden Know your responsibilities 112
Facility manager Follow JSC’s basic safety and health policies 101
Know your basic rights and responsibilities 102  
Know your specific responsibilities 103-112  
Know about safety and health standards 113  
Know the committees and councils JSC has for safety and health 114  
Know what safety and health records you must keep 115  
Know how you will be evaluated on safety and health 116  
JSC manager at any level Follow JSC’s basic safety and health policies 101
Know your basic rights and responsibilities 102  
Know your specific responsibilities 103-112  
Know about safety and health standards and how to get variances 113  
Know the committees and councils JSC has for safety and health 114  
Know what safety and health records you must keep 115  
Know how you and your organization will be evaluated on safety and health 116  

6. What if this handbook conflicts with the safety or health requirements of my organization?

This handbook takes precedence over all other JSC documentation in safety and health except for more stringent requirements that individual JSC organizations develop. If your organization has more stringent requirements than are in this handbook, you must follow them. If you find any less stringent JSC requirements than are in this handbook, bring them to the immediate attention of the Director of JSC’s Safety, Reliability, and Quality Assurance (SR&QA) Office.

7. How do I request changes to this handbook?

Submit a written change request to the Occupational Safety and Quality Assurance Branch that includes what you want to change and why. You may use an informal letter or electronic mail. The Occupational Safety and Quality Assurance Branch will review your request and tell you its decision to approve, modify, or disapprove your request. You will find the change process in Attachment 100A of Appendix 1B.

8. How do the chapter and paragraph numbers work in this handbook?

Chapter numbers have 3 digits. The first is the part it is contained in. The second and third are the sequence in that part. For instance, the first chapter in Part 2 is 200. The second chapter in Part 3 is 301.

Paragraphs are numbered within a chapter. Subparagraphs are designated with lower case letters and further divided by bullets. To cite a paragraph, or subparagraph, use the chapter number, and paragraph number, and subparagraph letter. For example, this paragraph is 100.7. If a subparagraph were involved, you would cite it as 101.2.a.